Academic Catalog

History (HIST)

HIST 101  History of Western Civilization I (GB) (D)  (3 credits)  

This course is the first half of the Western Civilization survey, beginning with its foundations in the ancient Middle East, and ending with the emergence of the modern West, ca. 1700. Key topics covered in this course include the spread of Greco-Roman culture, the rise of Christianity, the Middle Ages and Renaissance, and the emergence of "modernity." Students will examine what it meant to be "Western" during the eras in question.

HIST 102  History of Western Civilization II (GB) (D)  (3 credits)  

This course is the second half of the Western Civilization survey, from ca. 1648 to the twenty-first century. Key topics covered in this course include the Enlightenment and Age of Revolutions, industrialization and modernity, the world wars, and the Cold War. Students will analyze Europe's impact on the rest of the world via colonization and decolonization. Students will also focus on the religious, social and cultural concerns that have shaped the modern West.

HIST 103  History of the United States I (GB) (D)  (3 credits)  

This course is a survey of American history from the early British settlements of the 17th century through the Civil War. Key topics include: early British settlements in North America, British North America, American Revolution, the Constitution, the two-party system, War of 1812, market revolution, immigration, Jacksonian democracy, slavery and freedom, social reform, western expansion, North-South sectionalism and the Civil War. Students will also explore the development of the American republic in global context.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 101

HIST 104  History of the United States II (GB) (D)  (3 credits)  

This course is a survey of United States history from the end of the Civil War (1865) through the beginning of the 21st century. Key topics include Civil War Reconstruction, industrialization, populism, western expansion, immigration, progressivism, imperialism, World War I, the Depression, World War II, civil rights, Cold War, Vietnam era, feminism, digital revolution, terrorism, and the 21st centry wars. Students will focus on the United States' international interactions and impacts in a global age.

HIST 109  World History I (GB) (D)  (3 credits)  

This course has a global perspective, examining many different civilizations, cultures and societies around the world, comparing how they dealt with economic, social, political, technological, environmental and other major challenges, and how they organized their lives and interacted with other peoples from the early beginnings of humankind (ca 200,000 BCE) to the age of exploration (ca 1500 CE). Co-requisite: Eligibility for ENG 101.

Prerequisite(s): (ENG 012) or (ENG 018) or (ENG 060), ENG 101

HIST 110  World History II (GB) (D)  (3 credits)  

This course has a global perspective, examining many different civilizations, cultures and societies around the world, comparing how they dealt with economic, social, political, technological, environmental and other major challenges, and how they organized their lives and interacted with other peoples from the age of exploration (ca 1500 CE) to the present. Co-requisite: Eligibility for ENG 101.

Prerequisite(s): (ENG 012) or (ENG 018) or (ENG 060), ENG 101

HIST 112  History of Science and Technology  (3 credits)  

This course is a one-semester survey of the development of science and technology from the civilizations of the ancient Near East through the world of the late twentieth century. Theoretical and practical advances in science and technology are studied in their political, economic, social and intellectual contexts.

HIST 115  Exploring Ancient Civilizations  (3 credits)  

This course covers the foundations of western civilization from the end of the nomadic Paleolithic era (c. 20,000 BCE) through the rise of civilizations in the Neolithic and Bronze Ages, concluding with the rise and fall of the Roman Empire (476 CE). Students examine the political, social, economic, and technological forces which shaped the development of ancient civilizations, laying the foundation for the creation of the modern western world. Traveling in Greece and Italy provides students firsthand experience with the architecture, culture, physical remnants, and historical legacies of these civilizations. Course fee.

HIST 201  Maryland State and Local History  (3 credits)  

This course provides an overview of Maryland and Harford County history in the broader context of American history. Students will explore Maryland's emergence as a colony and progression through the revolutionary era, early Republic, Civil Way, industrialization, military and government expansion, prosperity and depression to the beginning of the 21st century. Class activities will draw upon the rich historical resources and people of Harford County, central Maryland and the upper Chesapeake region.

HIST 202  The Twentieth Century World (GB) (D)  (3 credits)  

This course covers world history since 1900. Topics include the World Wars; the rise of Communism, Fascism and religious fundamentalism; the Cold War; emergence of Third World nations; the United Nations, and other international agencies seeking protection of the disadvantaged. The environment, the women's movement, the scientific and technical revolution, and the search for peace are also studied.

HIST 203  American Military History  (3 credits)  

This course will engage students in the study of key aspects of American military history from the American Revolution through the wars of the 21st century, including the War of 1812, Mexican War, Civil War, World War I, World War II, Korean War, Vietnam War, Iraq and Afghanistan wars. Students will investigate military strategies, leadership, personal military experiences, key battles, wartime dissent, politics, civil policy, wartime controversies, domestic and economic impacts of military events.

HIST 204  History of Modern Russia  (3 credits)  

This course will cover Russian history from the rise of Imperial Russia in the late 17th century through the modern Russia of the 21st century. Key topics will include: Russia's ascendancy as an imperial power, 19th century Russian literature, serf emancipation, the Russian Revolution, Stalinist Soviet Union, Great Patriotic War (World War II), Sovient Union and the Cold War, the collapse of the Soviet Union and 21st century Russia, and cultural diversity in modern Russia.

HIST 207  African-American History (GB) (D)  (3 credits)  

This course will provide an opportunity for students to assess and appreciate the African-American experience from Colonial times to the present. Key topics include: the Middle Passage, the Revolutionary experience, the establishment of free African-American communities, slavery and abolitionism, the Civil War, Jim Crow and segregation, the Great Migration, wartime experiences, Harlem Renaissance, jazz and blues, civil rights, black nationalism, modern culture, rock-and-roll, hip hop culture, and the rise of a professional African-American culture.

HIST 208  American Ethnic History (D)  (3 credits)  

All Americans are "ethnic" and have some racial, religious, national or cultural roots in at least one other culture. This course examines the American ethnic experience from Colonial times to the present. Students study how various racial and ethnic groups have influenced American social, economic and political development. Students have an opportunity to trace their own family and ethnic heritage.

HIST 210  Central American and Caribbean History  (3 credits)  

This course provides an overview of the history of Central America and the Caribbean islands. Students will investigate indigenous civilizations and analyze the impact of western imperialism on regions. Specific topics include: indigenous peoples, the age of European exploration, the Atlantic world, slave trade, colonial competition, independence, imperial subjugation, 20th century political tumult, Cold War, modern nationalism, recent economic and policial progress and problems.

HIST 211  History of Africa (D)  (3 credits)  

This course is a one-semester introductory survey of the history of Africa from ancient to modern times. It surveys the medieval kingdoms, empires, states, and its peoples and diverse cultures. Pre-Colonial and post-Colonial systems are examined.

HIST 214  History of the Middle East (D)  (3 credits)  

This course is the story of the development of the predominantly Muslim Middle East (as well as North Africa), beginning in the seventh century and ending in the recent past. The role of Islam, and the relationship between Muslim and non-Muslim peoples in shaping religious, political and economic developments in this region are stressed.

Prerequisite(s): (ENG 101 and HIST 101) or (ENG 101 and HIST 102) or (ENG 101 and HIST 109) or (ENG 101 and HIST 110)

HIST 216  Introduction to Public History  (3 credits)  

This course introduces the student to the world of Public History. Public History is a specialty within the historical field, where professional historians interpret and present history to broad public audiences. The course will include activities on: the definition of Public History, physical exhibits, digital history, oral history, job opportunities, archival management, resource acquisition, project assessment and presentation of controversial topics. It will include intellectual and practical experiences for students interested in Public History careers.

Prerequisite(s): (HIST 101) or (HIST 102) or (HIST 103) or (HIST 104) or (HIST 109) or (HIST 110)

HIST 218  History of the British Isles  (3 credits)  

This course explores the history of the "four nations" of the British Isles-England, Ireland, Scotland, and Wales-over the last six centuries, from the 15th century to the recent past. Students will focus on political, cultural, social, and economic developments, and assess how interactions amongst the "four nations" have shaped the history of the British Isles. Attempts to forge a broader "British" cultural and social identity (or to resist this process, and preserve one's original identity) will also be stressed.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 and (HIST 102 or HIST 110)

HIST 220  History of American Women (D)  (3 credits)  

This course uses multicultural perspectives to examine the politics, works, family, creativity and sexuality of American women's lives from the colonial period to the present. Co-requisite: eligibility for ENG 101.

Prerequisite(s): (ENG 012) or (ENG 018) or (ENG 060) or (ENG 101)

HIST 263  Special Topics  (3 credits)  

Students will seek answers to timeless questions by exploring classic examples of espionage through the different periods of human history. Beginning with some classic, ancient examples, and working through the Renaissance, students will note the advances to the profession during the Elizabethan period and will consider how those forms of intelligence operations have influenced the course of history. From an American perspective, students will explore the intelligence activities during the Revolutionary War, the Civil War and World Wars I and II, ending during the Cold War. From a foreign perspective, students will cultivate an understanding of different nations’ espionage services and the roles they have played in foreign affairs throughout the same time period.

Prerequisite(s): HIST 101 or (HIST 102) or (HIST 109) or (HIST 110)

HIST 263A  Special Topics: America in the Stormy Sixties (1950-1975)  (3 credits)  

America in the Stormy Sixties (1950-1975) The 1960s was the United States' most dynamic and disruptive decade from the 1950s to the end of the 20th Century. This course deals with a series of dramatic events and changes, e.g. the missile crisis, assassination of JFK, the civil rights movement, the Great Society, the women's movement, the sexual revolution, Vietnam war and peace protests, environmental movement, the computer revolution, the drug scene, Rock 'n' Roll, Watergate - that almost brought about a national breakdown.

HIST 263B  Special Topics: Empires in Global Perspective  (3 credits)  

Empires in Global Perspective This course will analyze empires throughout history using a comparative approach over different chronological periods. The ways in which empires were built and maintained, and the ideas behind those empires, will be studied, as will the ways in which subject peoples collaborated with or resisted imperial control over time. Finally, the short- and long-term impact of empire in economic, military and social terms will be emphasized.

Prerequisite(s): HIST 101 or (HIST 102) or (HIST 109) or (HIST 110)

HIST 263C  Special Topics: History of Espionage: From Ancient Times to the Cold War  (3 credits)  

Students will seek answers to timeless questions by exploring classic examples of espionage through the different periods of human history. Beginning with some classic, ancient examples and working through the Renaissance, students will note the advances to the profession during the Elizabethan period and will consider how those forms of intelligence operations have influenced the couse of history. From an American perspective, students will explore the intelligence activities during the Revolutionary War, the Civil War, and World Wars I and II, ending during the Civil War. From a foreign perspective, students will cultivate an understanding of different nations' espionage services and the roles they have played in foreign affairs throughout the same period.

HIST 283  Internship in Public History  (3 credits)  

This course provides an opportunity for hands-on engagement in History. The course creates opportunities for students to work directly with regional Public History professionals to develop exhibits and otherwise earn credit for projects in Public History. Students will be able to apply their historical knowledge and skills to activities and project development. Permission of the instructor is required.