Academic Catalog

Economics (ECON)

ECON 101  Macroeconomics (GB)  (3 credits)  

Macroeconomics is an introduction to economic principles with emphasis on the analysis of aggregate income and employment. Topics include theory of income and employment, role of money and banking system, monetary and fiscal policies, and the problems of economic growth and fluctuations. Students completing ECON 101 or 102 cannot earn graduation credit for ECON 107. Pre-req: Eligibility for ENG 101.

Prerequisite(s): (ENG 012) or (ENG 018) or (ENG 101) or (MATH 101) or (MATH 103) or (MATH 102) or (MATH 109) or (MATH 111) or (MATH 212) or (MATH 216)

ECON 102  Microeconomics (GB)  (3 credits)  

Microeconomics deals with resource allocation under the price system, price and output determination when markets are characterized by perfect and imperfect competition, and price and employment determination in the resource market. Current problems of poverty, environment, energy and urbanization are analyzed. Students completing ECON 101 or 102 cannot earn graduation credit for ECON 107. Prereqs: Eligibility for ENG 101 and college-level math.

Prerequisite(s): (ENG 012) or (ENG 018) or (ENG 101)

ECON 105  United States Economic History  (3 credits)  

This course is a history of the U.S. economic development from Colonial times to the present in a world context. Major topics are geography and natural resources, the agrarian age, the factory system, the industrial revolution, and the new post world war society.

ECON 106  Consumer Economics and Personal Finance  (3 credits)  

This course studies economic theory as it applies to consumer decision making. Theory will be complemented by practical examples of consumer decisions on investing, saving and budgeting. Use of credit, insurance, housing, career and retirement planning within the decision-making process will be emphasized.

ECON 107  Introduction to Economics  (3 credits)  

This course is an introduction to modern macro and microeconomic theory and practice. The micro concepts of supply and demand, cost structure, profit maximization and wage determination make up the first half of the course. The remainder covers macroeconomic problems of unemployment and inflation with theoretical and applied policy solutions: fiscal, monetary and supply-side. Students completing ECON 101 or 102 cannot earn graduation credit for ECON 107.