Academic Catalog

Political Science (PS)

PS 101  American National Government (GB)  (3 credits)  

Students participate in an analysis of American national politics. Topics include the Constitution, political parties, interest groups, Congress, the Presidency, the Judiciary and recent public policies. Special consideration is given to the individual's relationship with the national government and to the factors influencing decision-making in the national government.

PS 102  State and Local Government (GB)  (3 credits)  

Students participate in analysis of state and local government, politics and policies. Topics include theory, intergovernmental regulations, state constitutions, political parties, interest groups, legislatures, executives, courts, subdivision governments, metropolitan politics and current issues. An effort is made to understand variables and pressures involved in state and local governmental decision-making, especially in Maryland and Harford County. Usually offered in the evening.

PS 106  Introduction to Law (Same course as PL 101) (GB)  (3 credits)  

This course introduces students to basic legal concepts, principles, and procedures. It is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the structure of the U.S. legal system including the role of the judicial, legislative, and executive branches; the history of law in the United States; the role of attorneys, law enforcement and other legal professionals; ethical and professional issues facing legal professionals; basic categories of law; litigation principles; and alternative dispute resolutions.

PS 201  Introduction to International Relations (GB)  (3 credits)  

This course has two major goals. One goal is to survey contemporary international issues so that students have a comprehensive understanding of issues in the Middle East, China, Russia, Africa and other areas of current interest. A second goal is to introduce students to the methods and objectives of foreign policy-making, the theory of the balance of power, the principles of international law and organization, and the development of regional integration such as in Europe. 3 credits.

Prerequisite(s): (ENG 012) or (ENG 018) or (ENG 060), ENG 101

PS 203  Comparative Politics and Governments  (3 credits)  

This course introduces students to the comparative study of politics and governments. Following an overview of political systems, the instructor selects representative countries from both the developed and developing worlds and highlights issues including political culture, participation, government structures, and public policies in each. Using case studies, students engage in comparative political analysis of both historical processes and current issues facing countries domestically and internationally. 3 credits.

Prerequisite(s): (ENG 012) or (ENG 018) or (ENG 060), ENG 101

PS 204  Urban Government and Politics (GB) (D)  (3 credits)  

Students participate in analyses of urban government and politics. The course examines the evolution of urban/metropolitan development, theory, and structure in the United States; identifies the key actors and addresses their roles both within the city and as liaisons with local, state and federal governments; and addresses the most pressing issues currently facing these jurisdictions, including: economic development, suburbanization, city infrastructure and finance, race relations and immigration, poverty, housing, law enforcement, and education.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 012 or ENG 101 or ENG 018

PS 263  Special Topics: Exploring U.S. Public Policy Making  (3 credits)  

This course will enable students to increase their understanding of contemporary issues in international relations in a global context. It places emphasis on gaining critical perspectives on contemporary theory and practice--the goal is to develop the student's ability to evaluate and explain contemporary issues from historical and theoretical perspectives in the disciplines of international relations. After a review of how nation-states interact in the international arean, we will travel to Europe and focus primarily on the two types of non-state actors (intergovernmental and nongovernmental) and the roles they play. We will visit and be briefed by representatives at the United Nations in New York, the European Union headquarters in Brussels, the International Court of Justice in The Hague and the Bretton Woods Project in London. This course is designed to address issues such as regionalization, globablization, international conflict, the future of democracy and others in an interdisciplinary way and provide a solid grounding in research methods in the social sciences. Students will gain a deep understanding of how international organizations affect the practice of world politics because they will experience it for themselves. A course fee of approximately $2500 covers all travel expenses. Pre-requisite: Instructor permission.

PS 281  Political Science Internship  (1 credit)  

Students work as interns in governmental agencies, in elected officials' offices or on political campaigns. The purpose of the internship includes providing students with practical experiences in politics and government, and giving to students the opportunity to determine if they desire a career in government. A wide variety of field placements exists.

PS 282  Political Science Internship  (2 credits)  

Students work as interns in governmental agencies, in elected officials' offices or on political campaigns. The purpose of the internship includes providing students with practical experiences in politics and government, and giving to students the opportunity to determine if they desire a career in government. A wide variety of field placements exists.

PS 283  Political Science Internship  (3 credits)  

Students work as interns in governmental agencies, in elected officials' offices or on political campaigns. The purpose of the internship includes providing students with practical experiences in politics and government, and giving to students the opportunity to determine if they desire a career in government. A wide variety of field placements exists.

PS 284  Political Science Internship  (4 credits)  

Students work as interns in governmental agencies, in elected officials' offices or on political campaigns. The purpose of the internship includes providing students with practical experiences in politics and government, and giving to students the opportunity to determine if they desire a career in government. A wide variety of field placements exists.

PS 285  Political Science Internship  (5 credits)  

Students work as interns in governmental agencies, in elected officials' offices or on political campaigns. The purpose of the internship includes providing students with practical experiences in politics and government, and giving to students the opportunity to determine if they desire a career in government. A wide variety of field placements exists.

PS 286  Political Science Internship  (6 credits)  

Students work as interns in governmental agencies, in elected officials' offices or on political campaigns. The purpose of the internship includes providing students with practical experiences in politics and government, and giving to students the opportunity to determine if they desire a career in government. A wide variety of field placements exists.